Music Documentary: Joy Of The Single

What even constitutes a single these days? The first song to be given to radio off a forthcoming album? It’s availability on itunes? Thankfully the 7″ single seems to be having a bit of a resurgence in popularity in independent and DIY circles (a quick browse in any of the remaining records stores in the country will find a host of great Irish talent competing for your hard earned cash) but it may not yet be back to the levels of adoration it once demanded. As mentioned in this BBC doc, we all remember saving pennies and trotting down to the local record shop to carefully mull over what would be our foray into the music world, probably based on a song or two from the radio or a recommendation from a friend. The film features the likes of Jack White, Richard Hawley and Rob Davies all recounting this and similar magical moments connected to ‘the single’ and acts as a sort of love letter to it, reminding tired, mp3 accustomed ears just how magical a piece of wax with a few grooves can be.

 

 

Music Documentary: The Undertones – Here Comes The Summer

Unlike music documentaries, truly great music biopics are hard to come by. If you don’t believe me then try being subjected to ‘True Movies music weekend’. Music documentaries usually allow those involved (sometimes in the loosest sense) to reveal something to fans, while biopics have to compete with the excitement of the myths and reputations built by fans themselves, and that’s before we even get into the reproduction of the music.

Good Vibrations was released this weekend to a flurry of critic and fan praise alike, and looks set to be this year’s ‘Control’. The film follows Terry Hooley and his journey to becoming the musical messiah of Belfast during The Troubles. The most known band to feature in the film are The Undertones, and although everyone thinks they know about the band behind what John Peel called ‘the most perfect pop song ever written’, there’s a lot more to the Tones than that one song. Exactly what their success meant to the people of Derry, their influence on music in Northern Ireland and their attitude to going on tour with The Clash in America is all detailed in the doc below.